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White Fence: Family Perfume Vol. 2

White Fence
Family Perfume Vol. 2
(Woodsist)

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Tim Presley seems to be a pretty prolific songwriter and staunch psych-pop enthusiast. Whether he’s playing with The Strange Boys, Darker My Love or Ty Segall, the dude is consistently churning out music in some form. His latest with his most consistent project, White Fence, is a synthy, garagey homage to 60’s pop that fluctuates between dream noise, acoustic charm, and variations on tape delay to create an interesting piece of work that bridges the gap of the generations quite nicely.

Family Perfume Vol. 2 opens with “Groundskeeper Rag (Man’s Man)” a Pink Floyd-esque number that highlights Presley’s affinity for airy, fragile soundscapes and melancholic vocal delivery. This essence continues throughout the album, but the mood changes from celestial gloom to 4-track whimsy to folky introspection. Songs such as the fingerpicked ballad of “I’d Sing” and country honk of “Lizards First,” the album weaves genres while keeping the psych tone as the preeminent theme that really ties the album together and makes for a cohesive project.

As I mentioned several times on other reviews, I often lament the disaffected conceit that dominates the current indie rock scene and how it conveys a sort of acrimony towards rock ‘n roll grandiosity and celebration that I’m fond of. But, with that said, Presley is a good songwriter and the sonic elements that he doubles up on create interesting melodies and solid songs that are still very much based in a simple structure that’s the hallmark of a quality melody. The album is quite good despite my minor objections. Check it out if you’re a fan of the dreamy psych (there’s that word again) of 60′s-era Byrds and modern-day weirdness.

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