Quantcast

Music

Lillimure: Lillimure

Lillimure: Lillimure

A jaunty “Wallflower” opens Lillimure’s self-titled, debut. With its stop and goes, floaty harmony vocals, slipping sly horn work, plus Sam Caldwell’s light tickling keys, the listener is brought head first into what turns out to be quite a dense jazz-pop release.

Nao Yoshioka: Undeniable

Nao Yoshioka: Undeniable

Too often these days you get deep into a ‘danceable’ record only to lose any real signature artistic essence to too much studio trickery and mined beats. I credit Nao Yoshioka and her long-time producer/manager (and SWEET SOUL RECORDS CEO) Naoki Yamanouchi with having the guts and skill to make each song its own little gem.

Vampire Weekend: Father of the Bride

Vampire Weekend: Father of the Bride

Vampire Weekend Father of the Bride (Sony Music) Father of the Bride is Vampire Weekend’s first album in six years, their longest […]

Tanya Gallagher: One Hand On My Heart

Tanya Gallagher: One Hand On My Heart

The snappy lead single, “Dark Side,” kicks off Tanya Gallagher’s new EP One Hand On My Heart. There is a fun running fast-to-catch-up to the
kinetic lyric delivery and flicky acoustic, organ, snare interplay here that makes for a neat opening brew. The very effective, “Barren Land,” two songs in,
really showcases Gallagher’s unique laconic pleading. It happens to be the first of the real standouts here, with its wonderful stark production allowing for the true heartache of the vocal breath and dignity. As is true throughout One Hand On My Heart the harmony vocals here are just perfectly placed.

Ghostfeeder: Star Beast

Ghostfeeder: Star Beast

Ghostfeeder Star Beast (Ghostfeeder) Three years after the [synth]poppy World Fameless, Tampa synthrock artist Ghostfeeder has released Star Beast, an 80s video […]

Neil Young & The Stray Gators: Tuscaloosa

Neil Young & The Stray Gators: Tuscaloosa

Dipping back into his history, as he has been want to do lately (as plenty of classic artists have been doing now that they can release stuff easily on the web) Neil Young presents an 11-song live document from highlights of a February 5th 1971 concert he played at the University Of Alabama in Tuscaloosa.

Jay Clark Band: The Time Is Now

Jay Clark Band: The Time Is Now

Dwayne Russell’s piano leading “Find a Way,” was well welcomed by the time it appears four tunes in. It’s a big country-rockin’ ballad, with a sprinkle of Train and a little Bon Jovi, but it’s as strong a tune as any of these ten. Actually, despite the heavy guitars from Clark and Rob Carlson, what makes lots of these tunes here work for me (especially the rockers) is Dwayne Russell’s organ.

Bus Stop Poets and the Lafayettes: Leave it to the Kids

Bus Stop Poets and the Lafayettes: Leave it to the Kids

The roiling acoustic and lifting harmonies of “You Won’t Miss Me (Here)” kicks us off to Bus Stop Poets Leave it to the Kids, their latest LP. This Detroit 4-piece has a very good handle on melody and layering their production, while keeping their acoustic sensibilities well in hand.

Eddy Yang: American Glory

Eddy Yang: American Glory

You have to give Eddy Yang his due. He managed all the writing, recording, production, mixing, mastering, and even produced the album artwork of his American Glory.

Kevin West: Story Of My Life

Kevin West: Story Of My Life

I love the mournful trumpet playing of Charlton Singleton and countering on sax from Mark Sterbank on the title track. This is the most directly confessional of all here and ‘jazzing things up,’ at the tail end of this EP really serves to put a nice spin on things nicely. Following in the vein, the jazz vibe, we get the jumpy jazzy “Not For Nothin’” ending, showing off all the players leading and interweaving on this wonderful instrumental ending to Story Of My Life.

Related Posts with Thumbnails