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Todd Warner Moore: Path Overgrown

The title track here starts off this dozen. It’s a lilting, acoustic guitar-led ode, sweet single note electric guitar lines from Roberto Diana and backing vocals from Leah Hart and Nicole Stella filling it out. The acoustic guitar leading weaves through the Latin-like shuffle of “Little Cobra,” while Moore manages his sweetest picking of the first half of Path Overgrown on the wonderful ballad “Buildings.” I like this one especially, again Moore mixing his expression-filled voice with his backing vocalists and weaving some strings into the sadness

Magical Beasts: Yes, My Love, I Am Reaching

Magical Beasts: Yes, My Love, I Am Reaching

Chicago’s Magical Beasts band (the core of the band is Nathan Paulus, John Herbst and Josh Miller) has just released this 6-song, Yes, My Love, I Am Reaching. Claiming what we get here are “the dynamics between Love, Sex, deep Yearning, and various forms of Union…” what certainly comes clear is that this trio, with some solid musicians backing them, have the laconic modern-folk thing down.

Eva Schubert: Hot Damn Romance

Eva Schubert: Hot Damn Romance

The pulsating “Brawler” is next, once again featuring Alexander Brown’s horn, on this certainly sly and sexy groover, while the title track is even slower and low down. Here we get lots of Michael Kavalerchi’s jazzy guitar interplay, again Brown blowing his lines, Mark Hundervad popping along on drums and Schubert vocally strutting across the cool backing.

Rob Alexander: Being Myself

Rob Alexander: Being Myself

Rob Alexander might be a physician anesthesiologist, but the last thing he’ll do is put you to sleep on his new full-length album, Being Myself. Here’s a 15-song bunch of tightly woven adult contemporary pop/rock, with the main man in fine voice, being backed by some wonderful players.

Eric George: Where I Start

Eric George: Where I Start

A single electric guitar line with a “clip-clopping” rimshot-sounding backing beat, plus some sweet harmonies from Addie Herbert, start us on our way into Eric George’s Where I Start. This Vermont-based songwriter, performer, and sound engineer presents a sly folky rock collection of 11 here.

Scott Chasolen: Living In Limbo

Scott Chasolen: Living In Limbo

A well-established NYC-based musician, Chasolen is highly sought after for session work and also plays in the well-known Pink Floyd tribute band, The Machine. On Living In Limbo, we get an intimate peek into the solo work of this talented player/singer/songwriter.

Herb Alpert: Over the Rainbow

Herb Alpert: Over the Rainbow

The call-to-action bleating solo horn intro of “Skinny Dip,” flowing into a MOR almost Latin beat opens Herp Alpert’s new Over The Rainbow. A musician of Alpert’s bearing and talent knows not to overstay his welcome, and the kick-off tunes here ends just about where it should, leading us into the sweet read on this dozen.

NYC COMIC CON 2019

NYC COMIC CON 2019

Reminded that “Cosplay is Not Consent” (thanks very much Comic-Con, as if I didn’t know) here men and women paint themselves, don various costumes (lots self-made) to be looked upon, have their picture taken, to be ogled. Confidence is high in the cosplay universe and simply put, everybody dressed at Comic Con, showing whatever of themselves they are showing, is hoping to be looked at.

Robbie Roberston: Sinematic

Robbie Roberston: Sinematic

The 13-songs of Robby Roberston’s new, Sinematic pretty much follows the ex-Band songwriter/guitarist/vocalist round his usual way of unique storytelling, barely-there voice, and guitar dexterity. The first from this icon in eight years, here we get some tunes influenced by Robertson scoring Martin Scorsese’s soon-to-be-released “The Irishman” and his forthcoming documentary “Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band” as Roberston’s comments on life. In fact, the first two tunes, the heavily layered “I Hear You Paint Houses,” featuring a Van Morrison vocal and tight wah-wah wailing is about Frank “The Irishman” Sheeran, and the synth stomp of the plodding “Once Were Bothers,” tell of Roberston dealing with the darkness of missing his Band bandmates.

Luiz e os Louises: Life’s a Cigarette

Luiz e os Louises: Life’s a Cigarette

The piano leads us through the last big ended here, “Going Home.” The choruses vocals at the coda and again subtle guitar from Lead bring it all home as a perfect ender to Life’s a Cigarette…which is pretty much a perfect little read of what Luiz e os Louises is all about.

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